Nicole Happel

Antrim-Front

1282 Antrim LP Colorado Springs CO 80910

Nicole Happel

3D Tour 1282 Antrim LP Colorado Springs, CO 80910

Photos do a great job of showing each room of a home, but a video does a great job of showing how the house flows. Travel room to room in this home through the virtual tour.

This Home's Great Features

Better than new 2-story! Built in 2016, this terrific 2-story home features wood floors throughout main level, granite counters, gourmet kitchen with espresso stained birch cabinetry, gas range, stainless appliances, upper-level loft, large master suite with private bath, oversized bedrooms with walk-in closets, finished basement with family room and private bedroom and bath, air conditioning, humidifier, professional landscaping, auto sprinkler and vinyl privacy fence. Great location...walk to nearby schools, park and shopping.

4

Bedrooms

4

Bathrooms

2,530

Sq Ft

5,000

Lot Sq Ft

Schools

HOA/Covenants

Lot Map

Monthly Utilities

Love this home? Find the Location

Downtown / Central Area Market Value

This home is located in the Downtown / Central area of Colorado Springs. Here is some additional information about the home values in this area.

Median Sales Price for Central

Central Days on Market

Central Sales Price to List Price Ratio

Central Sales Statistics

Learn more about the Central Neighborhood

Contact Us with Questions About this Home

Tahoe-Front

7253 Tahoe Rim DR Colorado Springs CO 80927

Nicole Happel

3D Tour 7253 Tahoe Rim DR Colorado Springs CO 80927

Photos do a great job of showing each room of a home, but a video does a great job of showing how the house flows. Travel room to room in this home through the virtual tour.

This Home's Great Features

Want views? Enjoy Pikes Peak and mountain views from this gorgeous property backing to open space and trails! Only 2 years old, this semi-custom home features large great room with gas fireplace, spacious dining room, engineered wood floors, gourmet kitchen with granite counters, center island, gas range, walk-in pantry, an office, finished walk-out basement, security system, dual zone heating system, air conditioning (currently being installed), upper-level loft, elegant master suite with 5 piece bath, walk-in shower, walk-in closets in all bedrooms, oversized Trex deck and professionally landscaped yard! Located on a quiet cul-de-sac street with nearby park. Close to community center with pool, a water park, tennis courts and fitness complex!

5

Bedrooms

5

Bathrooms

4,668

Sq Ft

9,878

Lot Sq Ft

Schools

HOA/Covenants

Lot Map

Monthly Utilities

Love this home? Find the Location

Marksheffel Area Market Value

This home is located in the Marksheffel area of Colorado Springs. Here is some additional information about the home values in this area.

Median Sales Price for Marksheffel

Marksheffel Days on Market

Marksheffel Sales Price to List Price Ratio

Marksheffel Sales Statistics

Learn more about the Marksheffel Neighborhood

Contact Us with Questions About this Home

homeowners insurance refund check

Getting Your Homeowner’s Insurance Refund

No one likes to leave money on the table at the end of a real estate transaction. During the sale process, home sellers can get so focused on the big items like purchase price, inspection items and closing costs they miss the smaller items that can actually enhance their bottom line as well.

One of the most overlooked items in this category is homeowners insurance. This is because so few homeowners understand how homeowners insurance works and more importantly what happens to the policy when they sell their home.

If you had a mortgage on your home, you also had a homeowners insurance policy that would have been required by your lender. Additionally, unless you made a substantial down payment, more than 20%, your mortgage lender would have paid your insurance and taxes through an escrow fund they set up.

If you remember when you purchased the property, there was a category of closing costs referred to as “Prepaids”. The first year of Property Insurance was included in this category.

Each month when you made your payment a small portion went towards the next year’s homeowners insurance policy, that money was deposited into the escrow account that your lender maintained. Annually when these expenses came due, your lender paid them for you.

There are essentially two categories of insurance monies. The first is what you’ve paid into your current years escrow account. After the sale of your home, your lender should automatically mail you a refund check for the monies still sitting in your escrow account. That check usually arrives within 3-6 weeks of closing.

The second type of money is what you have already prepaid. The insurance company already has this money. When you sell your home, there will most likely be a surplus of funds from months you won’t own the house.This surplus is what you are looking to get back from the insurance company.

Example, if your homeowners policy begins every November 1st, then your annual premium is paid at that time, for the upcoming 12-months. If you sell your home six months later, you have only used six months worth of your policy. Since you have already paid for the entire year, a refund is now due for the unused portion.

In order to get this money, you are going to need to actually cancel the Homeowner’s Insurance policy. If you do not actually cancel the policy, then the premium already paid will not be refunded.

    1. Determine your mortgage anniversary date-This is generally your closing date. Find your original closing documents. If you can’t find your closing documents, your Realtor can help you find these documents as well as Supply you with your closing date.
    2. Check your escrow account– Do this to see how much you paid your insurance company check your statement or online portal for your account.
    3. Calculate the unused portion of your policy based on your closing date-You do this by taking the total policy amount paid (#2) and dividing it by 365 days, this will give you your per day policy rate. Now add up them remaining days in the year after your closing date. Multiply this number by your per day policy rate
    4. Contact your insurance provider– To cancel policy and initiate the cancellation and refund
    5. Keep your Personal Property Covered-Don’t forget to make sure you have some kind policy in place to cover your personal property.

The insurance company has to be notified in order to cancel the policy. Once you do that, they have to refund the portion of the year’s policy which you did not use.

You should call your insurance Agent or Carrier’s Customer service line. Each company handles cancellations differently. Some might ask you to sign a document, formally indicating the desire to stop coverage while others might want you to write a letter stating your intent.

While you’re on the phone, it’s also a good idea to discuss coverage options for your personal property during the moving process. Unless you have a specific policy in place, once the homeowners policy goes away, so does the coverage on your personal property. Moving and storing stuff often leads to unexpected damages, so it’s best to have some type of coverage in place to protect your property.

If you have any other questions, feel free to give me a call.

Does Your Home Have a Firewall?

Last Wednesday on November 15th this home in Rapid City, South Dakota sustained minimal fire damage. The damage could have been much worse and completely destroyed the entire home were it not for the firewall which saved it.  Most people don’t understand what is a firewall in a house. A firewall is a fire-resistant barrier used to prevent the spread of fire for a prescribed period of time. In this case, the firewall between the storage area and living space was able to contain the fire and prevent it from consuming the whole house.

Houses usually have a firewall between the garage and the interior living space. This firewall consists of fire rated sheetrock which can contain a burn up to one hour before it penetrates the interior of the home. The intent of it is to slow the spread of fire from the garage to the living space.

In order to accomplish this, several components of a house must be made of fire resistive materials, and all must be working together for the system to work. Drywall used on the garage side of walls shared with living space must have a one hour fire resistive surface.

Firewall House: What is a Firewall in a House

If the garage ceiling is not covered with drywall, then the common walls between the garage and living space must be covered all the way up to the underside of the roof sheathing. You may see open rafters in the garage which is OK as long as there is no living space above the garage. In this example, if a fire starts in the garage, it cannot easily spread to the living space or the attic above the living space. It will be contained in the garage.

If there are breaches in the firewall they must be addressed to restore the integrity of the firewall. A breach in firewall could be a hole or crack in the sheetrock or even voids where sheetrock is missing altogether. Smaller breaches could include a missing switch plate cover to an electric outlet.

When a buyer gets a home inspection, the inspector will examine the firewall(s) in the home ensuring they are intact. Any voids will be noted as hazardous and should be addressed between buyer and seller prior to closing.

Sheetrock isn’t something we think about every day. And most of us don’t go around wondering if our sheetrock can contain a fire. But I’m sure the owners of this Rapid City home are grateful their sheetrock was intact and worked properly.

fall-foliage

2017 Real Estate Market Heads Strong into the Fall

This year Colorado Springs real estate market made the list of top 10 cities in the nation for hottest real estate markets, according to Realtor.com, and it’s no wonder.  Home prices continue to rise. Home sales are abundant. And there is significantly less inventory (homes for sale) than in years past. Here is a breakdown of what is happening in our little boom town this year.

Single Family Home Sales =  UP 5.6% over last year

Average Price for a Home =  UP 11.2% over last year (currently at $313,652)

Total Homes for Sale =  DOWN 15% from last year

Condo/Townhome Sales = UP 15% over last year

Average Price for a Condo/Townhome = UP 10.5% over last year (currently at $193,564)

Total Condos/Townhomes for Sale = DOWN 25.9% from last year

Supply is low. Demand is high. More buyers are buying and relocating here. And there are less homes for them to choose from. Competition is steep, driving home prices way up. Bidding wars are the norm, especially in the under $500,000 price range.

I recently had two listings which received multiple offers within 24 hours of going on market. And both ended up selling for above asking price!  We call this a seller’s market where homes sell fast and at top dollar.  Buyers, on the other hand, are at a disadvantage. They have less homes to choose from and prices are higher than ever.  The only fortunate thing is interest rates remain low, enabling buyers to qualify for higher amounts.

The big question? Will this trend continue?  And for how long? My belief is we will see this robust market for awhile, and definitely well into next year.  But eventually there will be a correction. History has proven markets like this always correct at some point. If you are looking to buy or sell and want to find out more about the market, give me a call.

This year Colorado Springs real estate market made the list of top 10 cities in the nation for hottest real estate markets, according to Realtor.com, and it’s no wonder.  Home prices continue to rise. Home sales are abundant. And there is significantly less inventory (homes for sale) than in years past. Here is a breakdown of what is happening in our little boom town this year.

Single Family Home Sales =  UP 5.6% over last year

Average Price for a Home =  UP 11.2% over last year (currently at $313,652)

Total Homes for Sale =  DOWN 15% from last year

Condo/Townhome Sales = UP 15% over last year

Average Price for a Condo/Townhome = UP 10.5% over last year (currently at $193,564)

Total Condos/Townhomes for Sale = DOWN 25.9% from last year

Supply is low. Demand is high. More buyers are buying and relocating here. And there are less homes for them to choose from. Competition is steep, driving home prices way up. Bidding wars are the norm, especially in the under $500,000 price range.

I recently had two listings which received multiple offers within 24 hours of going on market. And both ended up selling for above asking price!  We call this a seller’s market where homes sell fast and at top dollar.  Buyers, on the other hand, are at a disadvantage. They have less homes to choose from and prices are higher than ever.  The only fortunate thing is interest rates remain low, enabling buyers to qualify for higher amounts.

The big question? Will this trend continue?  And for how long? My belief is we will see this robust market for awhile, and definitely well into next year.  But eventually there will be a correction. History has proven markets like this always correct at some point. If you are looking to buy or sell and want to find out more about the market, give me a call.

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Colorado Springs Best Coffee Ever

Colorado Springs has it all in the way of places to shop and eat. Chain stores pepper the city from North to South selling familiar goods like clothing and dog food and Starbucks coffee.  But we also have the specialty boutique stores, independently-owned and locally run offering unique, high-quality goods which you cannot get anywhere else.  I’m talking about Colorado Springs-based shops like the Wimberger Bakery which bakes its finest German breads right here, or the Ranch Foods Direct meat market which offers hormone and antibiotic free, Colorado-raised beef…or one of my personal favorites, Colorado Coffee Merchants which locally roasts and sells the best coffee I’ve ever tasted.

HOW IT ALL STARTED

Founded in 2004, Colorado Coffee Merchants opened for business in a quaint stucco building on Filmore Street located in the central, and what-used-to-be more industrial part of town. The owner, Eric Umenhofer, claims his store and success was completely unintentional.  A former firefighter, he had a passion for good, well-prepared coffee. As a result, he and some of his work friends developed a hobby of roasting their own coffee beans.  Eventually, they landed this location, a commercial building where they could install the giant roasters with tall metal stacks venting through the roof and roast to their heart’s content. They had no idea this “hobby” would draw such local interest. And before long, they had a cult following of committed coffee drinkers insisting to buy some. What began as a hobby evolved into a thriving coffee shop, offering single serves or beans to go as well as scrumptious eats from local vendors.

WHAT MAKES THIS COFFEE SO GOOD?

I am told it’s the combination of the air roasting method plus the finest quality imported beans from trusted growers all over the world which makes this coffee taste so darn good. The coffee brand is called Umpire Estate Mountain Roasters. The beans are imported in select batches from places like Guatemala, Ethiopia, Italy, Mexico and even France.

A GOOD FEELING

Step inside and you’re immediately warmed by familiar smiling faces, the heavenly smell of good coffee and rustic atmosphere. This local store is always buzzing with loyal customers greeted daily by the staff or owner himself. Yah, he knows everyone by name. How he remembers everyone I don’t quite know. But I guarantee you’ll feel welcome. And if it’s roasting day, you just might leave with your clothes and hair smelling of great coffee!

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The Up-Front Costs of Buying a Home

You might be getting a mortgage for your new home, but did you know?  There are fees that you, the buyer, must pay prior to that new mortgage and prior to closing on your new home.  Buyers often ask “what money will I need up-front for this purchase?”  Here is what I tell them:

EARNEST MONEY

When you write a purchase contract for a home, there is deposit money usually required.  This is known as earnest money.  It tells the seller of the transaction that you are serious about this purchase and are willing to put some money at risk to secure it.  Think of it as a security deposit when you rent a home.  You make this deposit at the beginning of your lease, and typically you get that back when the lease ends.  Earnest money acts much the same way.  You make this deposit at the beginning of your purchase contract, and you typically get that back when you close.  The amount of earnest money usually depends on the price of the home.  While there is no set standard or amount for earnest money, we typically see it at about 1% of the purchase price.  Example…if you’re buying a $300,000 home your earnest money deposit could be around $3,000.   But sometimes that amount can be negotiated.

HOME INSPECTION FEES

Once you are under contract for a particular property, you will probably get a home inspection done.   A home inspection allows the buyer to inspect the condition of the property they are buying.  Since the buyer benefits from this inspection, the buyer gets to pay for the cost of it.  A home inspection usually runs $300-400 depending on the age and size of the home. There are additional options for inspection which can add to that cost.  For example, if you choose to get a Radon test during the inspection you will probably pay an additional $130 for that.   Inspection fees are paid at the time of service.

APPRAISAL

Once you are past the inspection phase, your lender will order a home appraisal to ensure your purchase price is at market value.  Lenders usually collect the appraisal money up-front from you, the buyer.   Typically the cost of an appraisal can run anywhere from $450-$675 depending on the type of financing you are getting.  Government appraisals, for example, usually cost more than conventional loan appraisals.  Why?  Because government loan appraisals are a bit more involved. (I’d like to make a joke here but I should probably leave politics out!)

MISCELLANEOUS COSTS

1. SLEEP   –   If you are normal, purchasing a home will probably cost you some sleep.  Most buyers tell me they wake up in the night anxious about their big purchase or excited to move in and decorate. So plan to lose some sleep while under contract.  You may find yourself wide awake in bed imagining where your furniture and wall hangings will go in your new home!

2. COUNSELING   –  Buying a home can be quite stressful.   Your emotions will be heightened.  I’ve even seen people argue or cry during this process.  You may end up in the self-help section of your local bookstore or on the couch telling a counselor about your home buying ordeal.

3. SPLURGES FOR THE NEW HOME   –   No matter who you are, whether you’ve owned a home prior or not, you will at some point find yourself purchasing shower curtains or paint or supplies for your new house.  Call it the nesting instinct.  We all do it.  When you buy a new home you buy some new stuff, too.

YOUR DAY OF CLOSING

On this wonderful, much anticipated day you finally get the keys to your new home.  All those up-front costs are a thing of the past, and you will now enjoy the rewards of home ownership.   You may look back on your purchase and think “this was a lot to go through.”    But hopefully, you can say like many of my clients have…”this was fun!”   If you have a good realtor/lender/inspector/team in your corner the process can and should be quite fun.

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Nicole Happel’s Favorite Pumpkin Bread

It’s that time of year again!  Every October I post my favorite recipe for pumpkin bread.  I’ve tried a few, and this one is by far the best.  I think it’s the cream cheese which makes it extra yummy.  And there’s a funny story about how I came across this recipe.  One day I got home from work, and in my mailbox was this pumpkin bread recipe from another Realtor, who was soliciting my neighborhood for business. I doubt she knew she was sending it to “the competition.”  Anyhow, I read the ingredients and it looked pretty good.  I gave it a try and must say it’s the best I’ve had.  So here you go, my favorite recipe for pumpkin bread…compliments of me and that other Realtor out there.

PUMPKIN BREAD

*Makes one 9″x5″x3″loaf

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Ingredients

4 ounces cream cheese, softened

1 cup canned pumpkin

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup butter, softened

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 1/4 cups white sugar

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

2 eggs

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Grease one 9x5x3 inch loaf pan.  Put softened cream cheese, butter and sugar in mixing bowl. Cream together well.  Beat in eggs one at a time until well blended.  Mix in pumpkin.  Set aside.

In another bowl combine flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt cinnamon, cloves and walnuts.  Stir together.  Pour all at once over batter.  Fold together, just enough to moisten. Pour into greased pan.

Bake at 350 degrees for 60-70 minutes until inserted toothpick comes out clean.  Cool 10 minutes in pan.  Remove to rack to finish cooling.

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Being a Realtor Is About Personal Relationships

Over the years my clients often become friends.  After all, we talk and email daily during the course of the transaction, and with that, we become quite familiar with each other’s lives and routines.  We share stories which go beyond real estate, delving into the personal about our kids and pets and how we feel today.  Clients have met my family, joined us boating at the lake, taken pictures of our dogs.  They invite me to their weddings and baby showers and parties.  They sometimes call for relationship advice or where to buy a good burger.  One client currently under contract is pregnant, so we begin our conversations with “how are you feeling today?  are you so excited to be having a girl?”  My business is so personal.

Today I received this special and oh-so-personal poem.  It was written by a past client whom I met at the park where we all run.  And I recently sold their home.

She’s up in the morning awake with the dawn

   Checks her computer and then she is gone

   Out for a run in the brisk morning air

   Back for a shower and washing her hair

   A quick bite to eat, she’s ready to go

   Staging a house so it’s ready to show

   Back in the office she answers her phone

   Wishing some clients would leave her alone

    Off then to school to pick up her child

   Gotta be careful cause traffic is wild

   She sits down to dinner and gets a brief rest

   Knowing that this day she gave it her best

   Early to bed with her pillow and dog

   Once again in the morning, she goes out for her jog.

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Preparing Your Teen for Driving

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Back when I was a teen getting a driver’s license was pretty simple. We enrolled in driver’s education offered in public schools and at the end of the course we took an exam and upon passing were eligible for a learner’s permit. The permit was obtained at the local DMV where you fill out an application and maybe showed them your birth certificate (if you even had one). You had to be 15 1/2 years old to get this permit and then your parents would take you out and teach you how to drive. You didn’t log your hours on the road.  It wasn’t that formal. We just drove with adults until turning 16, at which point we could go get our actual driver’s license. There wasn’t a lot of regulation to it.

Well, times have changed. Today it’s quite different than that. My daughter recently went through the process, so it’s fresh in my mind. Allow me to enlighten you about obtaining a Colorado driver’s permit and license today.

Start with Driver’s Education

First, driver’s education is no longer offered in the public schools. So you have to find a private driving school and enroll them in it. In Colorado Springs we have many options for schools like Academy School of Driving, 1st Drive or Master Drive. I opted for Master Drive since they have a great reputation here. The student must be at least 14 years old in order to enroll. They must take 30 hours of classroom training. Additional behind-the-wheel training is available through each school but is not mandatory. Upon completion of the 30-hour class, the student takes a written exam, but he can only do that after turning 15. This exam can be taken at the driving school or at the local DMV. In order to pass the exam, the student cannot miss more than five answers. Otherwise, they must re-take the exam.  After passing the student can now apply for a learner’s permit.  

Obtain the Learner’s Permit

In order to get the permit the student must meet the following requirements:

1. They must be at least 15 years of age

2. They must show proof of 30 hours of driver training school

3. They must show proof that they passed the written exam or be prepared to take the exam at the DMV

4. They must have a valid birth certificate

5. They must have a valid social security card

6. They must show two written proofs of their current Colorado address (which I found a bit challenging because my 15-year-old doesn’t receive a lot of official mail at the house yet)

7. They/you must pay a fee of $17

8. They must have a parent or guardian with them at the time of application so that person can sign as the responsible party for the minor behind the wheel (basically, if your kid crashes and does any harm or damage to another it’s your liability).

Once you’ve done all this the applicant is issued their learner’s permit. The student driver must have that permit for one year before they can obtain an actual driver’s license. During that year the student driver must log at least 50 hours behind the wheel with an adult who is at least 21 years old. Those driving hours are written on a form provided by the DMV, and that form must be signed by the parent or guardian. 

Finally the Driver’s License

After the year is up and the student driver has logged the required hours, they can then go to the DMV and get their driver’s license.  There they will have to pass a written exam and actual evaluation behind the wheel. 

I know it sounds like a lot to go through, and at first, I was slightly overwhelmed by the regulation involved here. But I have concluded that it’s all good. Requiring kids to spend more time learning how to drive is a plus, not only for their own safety but for the safety of all drivers on the road. Requiring more documentation at the time of application is a plus because driving is a privilege for US residents, and proving proof is a small price to pay. And requiring kids to drive for at least one year before obtaining a license is a plus because it’s more supervised time behind the wheel. Thank you, Colorado, for holding us to this higher standard!

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Colorado Springs, CO 80903

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